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Is bungo stray dogs over


Is bungo stray dogs overpopulation? I know from past posts that she doesn't believe that all strays are just as good as pet dogs, I am asking because today she brought me this:

I asked if I can keep her and she said I don't have to, she just feels like she needs to help but would like to see if I keep her for the purpose of being a pet.

Do you think it's okay for her to just take this stray pup that would otherwise be sent to the pound, and keep it for some personal purposes?

I really want to take her in but she's been known to not like dogs of all kinds but in this case the situation is a bit different.

Re: How do I know if she's overpopulation?

Originally Posted by lindsayf

Do you think it's okay for her to just take this stray pup that would otherwise be sent to the pound, and keep it for some personal purposes?

It is always more polite to adopt a pet or k9 than take in a stray.

Re: How do I know if she's overpopulation?

We are in a similar situation right now. If you could have adopted a pet or a k9 that would have been the much better thing to do. However, we got a little too attached to her, so we took her in. I just want to let you know that we love her dearly, but we also would never have adopted if we knew that she was a stray. We did have it in our minds that the next time we needed a pet that she was ours.

If you find that you can love her, then by all means take her in. If you can't do that, then I think it is best to just let her go and see if there is someone else out there who can.

Re: How do I know if she's overpopulation?

Originally Posted by lindsayf

I know that this is probably considered inappropriate, but it's really difficult to find a good place to talk about this online. It's really really, really difficult to find people in my situation. I just want to see if any of you can understand where I'm coming from.

She's got her puppy shots up to date. She's up to date on her heartworm and spay/neuter shots. She is being spayed within the next month and we are trying to find a good home for her before that. She's very friendly and outgoing and we are all just hoping to find a forever home for her.

I just want to know what my options are. What's the proper response to take in this situation? I'd like to know from a professional as opposed to someone who just thinks they're qualified to know.

Re: How do I know if she's overpopulation?

Originally Posted by lindsayf

I know that this is probably considered inappropriate, but it's really difficult to find a good place to talk about this online. It's really really, really difficult to find people in my situation. I just want to see if any of you can understand where I'm coming from.

She's got her puppy shots up to date. She's up to date on her heartworm and spay/neuter shots. She is being spayed within the next month and we are trying to find a good home for her before that. She's very friendly and outgoing and we are all just hoping to find a forever home for her.

I just want to know what my options are. What's the proper response to take in this situation? I'd like to know from a professional as opposed to someone who just thinks they're qualified to know.

I just don't understand how a vet would recommend we keep her at home if she's overpopulating the neighborhood. It's not a good option for me and I don't understand why the vet is recommending it. I really don't know how to ask him to clarify his message.

I think it would be appropriate for you to say something like "I want to make sure that you know that in the US, all spayed dogs (including female dogs) have to have an annual rabies vaccine. You should be bringing your dog to the vet as soon as her spay surgery is over. After all, the more time her immunity to rabies is lowered, the greater the chance of her contracting the virus. And I will check the records to make sure she's up to date on her rabies vaccines".

I don't know the answer to your situation, but I am concerned about the amount of unspayed females in the area. I think I would say something like: "I'm concerned about the number of unspayed females in your neighborhood. I believe it's a good idea for your dog to have regular spay/neuter surgery. In the best interest of your dog and the safety of the public, you should spay her. I hope you won't be opposed to it".

When I was a new LHO it was very uncommon to get a call from a potential client (new or not) that said "my dog is killing others. I think it's best for him to be neutered". That was way back in the 1970's.

If you feel your vet is going to say "we just don't do it", get another vet.

You can also explain that your neighbors are saying that their dog is killing your dog. (It might be that they mean other neighborhood dogs)

The vet is telling you to keep your dog to yourself. When this happens I don't bother with talking to the vet any further, I just go ahead and do what I was told.

It is also perfectly ok to say your neighbors' comments about your dog's aggression are unfair to you and your dog, in the same way that the vet can tell you that there is no way to control the aggressive behavior of your neighbor's dog.

I would not be surprised to learn that the other vet does not believe that a dog is a threat to public safety or your dog is in danger. I would want to learn if she was licensed to practice medicine in the state in which you live, and how she has kept her license current. Ask to speak to her supervisor, if it is a solo practice.

This is a very serious situation. I hope that you can make a good and safe choice for your own dog.

The vet is telling you to keep your dog to yourself. When this happens I don't bother with talking to the vet any further, I just go ahead and do what I was told.

Click to expand...

The problem is that's what she told me. The vet doesn't believe me. The vet doesn't care about what I say, she just looks at me, at her feet and says "he's fine" every time I tell her about his behavior. I've brought up his history of aggression towards other dogs and other pets too and she just tells me he's a very loving, caring, sweet boy, even though she clearly sees his aggression towards other dogs.

It is also perfectly ok to say your neighbors' comments about your dog's aggression are unfair to you and your dog, in the same way that the vet can tell you that there is no way to control the aggressive behavior of your neighbor's dog.

I would not be surprised to learn that the other vet does not believe that a dog is a threat to public safety or your dog is in danger. I would want to learn if she was licensed to practice medicine in the state in which you live, and how she has kept her license current


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